Forgotten British Dishes

If you live outside of Britain, you most likely only familiar with a handful of traditional British dishes. Most of us have heard of Sunday Roast, Beef Wellington and English Breakfast. However, British cuisine is maybe not as varied in spices and flavours as other cuisines, it offers an extensive list of heart-warming options and […]

If you live outside of Britain, you most likely only familiar with a handful of traditional British dishes. Most of us have heard of Sunday Roast, Beef Wellington and English Breakfast. However, British cuisine is maybe not as varied in spices and flavours as other cuisines, it offers an extensive list of heart-warming options and we thought winter s a perfect time to discover British classic dishes or at remind you of the ones you probably forgot.

Toad-in-the-hole

Toad-in-the-hole

This dish is simple and perfect for a winter quick dinner option that all family will love. Similar to Yorkshire Pudding but with the addition of sausages, this dish involves dipping the sausages int the batter before roasting.

Welsh rarebit

Welsh Rarebit is a speciality recipe for cheese on toast and is an ultimate breakfast or brunch staple for some, although often also a popular lunch option. Why is it called Welsh rarebit then? According to a 16th-century joke, the Welsh were famous for their love of toasted cheese and hence comes the name and a surprising fact how old this dish is! For anyone who wants to try out the cheese on toast the Welsh Way, see full recipe here.

Suet pudding

When British people refer to a dish as pudding, it usually means dessert. Suet, on the other hand, is something many savoury pies have as a topping. This dessert is usually boiled and made with flour, bread crumbs, raisins and spices. Dating back to 1700s, this is surely an old one!

Pease pudding

This is something you still see on supermarket shelves in the UK. Pease pudding is a savoury dessert dish which is made of boiled vegetables, typically split yellow peas, with water, salt, and spices. It can be served alongside ham or beef.

Syllabub

This dessert was first mentioned in literature in 1537. And some describe its origins as a bubbly alcoholic milkshake. Nowadays, it is made with whipped cream, wine or sherry, sugar and lemon juice. Chranachan is a similar dessert, but most popular in Scotland.

We hope this post inspired you to make something traditional this winter. If not, you can always try those if you visiting Britain!

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